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Omniglot - a guide to writing systems
Writing systems: alphabetic | syllabic | logographic | alternative | A-Z index
 

Morse Code

Origins
Morse code was invented by Samuel F. B. Morse (1791-1872), a painter and founder of the National Academy of Design. He conceived the basic idea of an electromagnetic telegraph in 1832, and produced the first working telegraph set in 1836. This made transmission possible over any distance. The first morse code message, "What hath God wrought?", was sent from Washington to Baltimore.

Today experienced operators copy received text without the need to write as they receive, and when transmitting, can easily converse at 20 to 30 words per minute. Morse code will always remain a viable means of providing highly reliable communications during difficult communications conditions.

Morse code can be transmitted using sound or light, as sometimes happens between ships at sea. It is used in emergencies to transmit distress signals when no other form of communication is available. The standard international distress signal is --- (SOS)

Source: http://www.arrl.org/FandES/ead/learncw/

Letters

- - -- - - -- --- --
a b c d e f g h i j k
- -- - --- -- --- - - - -
l m n o p q r s t u v
-- -- --- -- -- --- ---- -- ---- --- --
w x y z ch

Punctuation

--- ---- -- --- ---- -- -- ---- --
period/
full-stop
comma question
mark
colon apostrophe hyphen fraction
bar
parentheses quotation
marks

Numbers

---- --- -- -
1 2 3 4 5
- -- --- ---- -----
6 7 8 9 0

Other alternative writing systems:
Braille, Deseret, Gy?nz, Mesa, Moon, Morse code, Nikhilipi, Quikscript/Read Alphabet, Shavian, Theban, Unifon, 12480
 

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